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Intense heat bakes community – weekend weather will likely feel 105-110

Southeast Texas continued a heat advisory Wednesday after the area saw temperatures rise to as high as 99 degrees and heat indexes as high as 110 on Monday and Tuesday, part of a pattern of intense heat across several Southern states.

Tuesday’s high temperature for the region was 99 degrees, 97 on Monday, according to information from Weather Underground.

Andy Patrick with the National Weather Service in Lake Charles, Louisiana, said the highest temperatures in the region would likely be north of Lake Charles and into central Louisiana.

“We may see a small break in the heat,” Patrick said. “We may see similar conditions this weekend where heat indices range from 105-110. The pattern for next week shows the more intense heat shifting west, and Southwest Louisiana will be dealing with more daily thunderstorm activity. Still heat indices may reach 105 or a little higher.”

Patrick said long-term climate trends indicate more above-normal temperatures are possible through the end of August.

Higher chances for thunderstorms from a cold front expected to pass through Wednesday and Thursday may bring some relief from the heat, through heat indices could still climb as high as 102-105, Patrick said.

The National Weather Service forecast for Thursday included a 40 percent chance for showers and thunderstorms mainly after 1 p.m. Temperatures were expected to reach up to 93 degrees with heat index values as high as 103.

To beat the heat the National Weather Service offers tips to be safe during hot days. If working out doors, be sure to stay hydrated and take breaks in the shade as often as possible. Be sure to check up on elderly, sick or those without air conditioning. Never leave children or pets unattended in a vehicle, and be sure to keep vehicles locked at home to keep children away from hot interiors.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include dizziness, excessive sweating, cool or pale skin, nausea or vomiting, rapid or weak pulse and muscle cramps.

Symptoms of throbbing headaches, lack of sweating, red and hot skin, nausea, rapid and strong pulse, or a body temperature above 103 degrees, may be signs of heat stroke. Call 911 immediately and take action to cool the person until help arrives.

For more information, visit weather.gov/safety/heat.