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Compare Texas gas prices to others across the nation

Texas gas prices have fallen 1.7 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.27/g today, according to GasBuddy’s daily survey of 13,114 stations.

Gas prices in Texas are 7.9 cents per gallon lower than a month ago, yet stand 28.6 cents per gallon lower than a year ago.

According to GasBuddy price reports, the cheapest station in Texas is priced at $1.99/g today while the most expensive is $3.19/g, a difference of $1.20/g.

The lowest price in the state today is $1.99/g while the highest is $3.19/g, a difference of $1.20/g.

The cheapest price in the entire country today stands at $1.75/g while the most expensive is $5.49/g, a difference of $3.74/g.

The national average price of gasoline has fallen 5.1 cents per gallon in the last week, averaging $2.58/g today.

The national average is down 6.3 cents per gallon from a month ago, yet stands 22.4 cents per gallon lower than a year ago.

Neighboring areas and their current gas prices:
• Midland Odessa- $2.36/g, down 2.1 cents per gallon from last week’s $2.38/g.
• San Antonio- $2.18/g, down 3.7 cents per gallon from last week’s $2.21/g.
• Austin- $2.22/g, down 1.9 cents per gallon from last week’s $2.24/g.

Historical gasoline prices in Texas and the national average going back a decade:
October 28, 2018: $2.56/g (U.S. Average: $2.81/g)
October 28, 2017: $2.24/g (U.S. Average: $2.46/g)
October 28, 2016: $2.05/g (U.S. Average: $2.21/g)
October 28, 2015: $1.93/g (U.S. Average: $2.19/g)
October 28, 2014: $2.81/g (U.S. Average: $3.02/g)
October 28, 2013: $3.03/g (U.S. Average: $3.27/g)
October 28, 2012: $3.32/g (U.S. Average: $3.54/g)
October 28, 2011: $3.28/g (U.S. Average: $3.44/g)
October 28, 2010: $2.63/g (U.S. Average: $2.79/g)
October 28, 2009: $2.55/g (U.S. Average: $2.67/g)

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, said the national average price of gasoline has fallen for the third straight week.

“Most states saw notable declines, while California and the Great Lakes states saw the largest dips,” DeHaan said. “Solidly in the rear view are California’s previous refinery issues that caused prices to soar, but now a new problem- filling up with the cheaper gasoline as power outages have cut access to hundreds of stations across the state. GasBuddy has again activated its emergency tracker for California, and this event is unlikely to impact gas prices, so long as refineries don’t lose power.

“Across the rest of the country, the Great Lakes states saw prices fall far faster than wholesale prices, and a correction is likely in the region. With that exception, the nation should see a fourth straight week of decline with over three-quarters of stations passing along lower prices in the coming week.”